this-is-some-shit:

One of my favorite Tomi Ungerer illustrations

this-is-some-shit:

One of my favorite Tomi Ungerer illustrations


Springboard for my next comic, I suppose. 

Springboard for my next comic, I suppose. 


underwhelminglovecraft:

This week’s Underwhelming Lovecraft Comic Synopsis is the 1921 short story “The Outsider”, which saw print in the April, 1926 issue of Weird Tales. It has a shocking twist ending where you find out he’s a monster and crap, I just ruined it. Sorry.

underwhelminglovecraft:

This week’s Underwhelming Lovecraft Comic Synopsis is the 1921 short story “The Outsider”, which saw print in the April, 1926 issue of Weird Tales. It has a shocking twist ending where you find out he’s a monster and crap, I just ruined it. Sorry.


punditfromanotherplanet:

Original Illustration by Bob Clarke from “Modern Architecture” in Mad Magazine #46
Original illustration by Bob Clarke from “Modern Architecture” in Mad magazine #46, published by EC Comics, April 1959. The Bristol Board

Bob Clarke was an underrated talent. Gah, that’s beautiful.

punditfromanotherplanet:

Original Illustration by Bob Clarke from “Modern Architecture” in Mad Magazine #46

Original illustration by Bob Clarke from “Modern Architecture” in Mad magazine #46, published by EC Comics, April 1959. The Bristol Board

Bob Clarke was an underrated talent. Gah, that’s beautiful.


LEAN, MEAN BOOK SALE FINDS.Late Saturday afternoon I went to the Oconee Library book sale at the Watkinsville Civic Center. I tried to stay focused and not pick up too many impulse buys (there are a few books from last year I haven’t gotten around to reading yet), but I was pretty happy with what I found. Going clockwise from the top left;1) A 1979 Golden Books collection of Ripley’s Believe It or Not comics for my 8 year old daughter, who’s into all things bizarre.2) A fortunate find; a mammoth 1970 collection of Fritz Leiber’s “Fafhrd & the Gray Mouser” stories, entitled “The Three of Swords”. I liked Howard Chaykin and Mike Mignola’s adaptation of these stories that Dark Horse reprinted awhile back, so I read some of the original stories in various adventure anthologies. A lot of the stories were scattered about in various paperback from all eras, so it was nice to run across a single collection of them. 3) For my 5 year old son, a 1999 comics digest of Scooby-Doo comics.4) Eagle-eyed Rich Tommaso ran across this one; Donald Westlake’s posthumous thriller “The Comedy is Finished”, which Hard Case Crime, knowns for their wonderful crime noir paperback line, published as a hardback. It only came out in 2012, so I was surprised to see it without a dust jacket.

LEAN, MEAN BOOK SALE FINDS.

Late Saturday afternoon I went to the Oconee Library book sale at the Watkinsville Civic Center. I tried to stay focused and not pick up too many impulse buys (there are a few books from last year I haven’t gotten around to reading yet), but I was pretty happy with what I found. Going clockwise from the top left;

1) A 1979 Golden Books collection of Ripley’s Believe It or Not comics for my 8 year old daughter, who’s into all things bizarre.

2) A fortunate find; a mammoth 1970 collection of Fritz Leiber’s “Fafhrd & the Gray Mouser” stories, entitled “The Three of Swords”. I liked Howard Chaykin and Mike Mignola’s adaptation of these stories that Dark Horse reprinted awhile back, so I read some of the original stories in various adventure anthologies. A lot of the stories were scattered about in various paperback from all eras, so it was nice to run across a single collection of them. 

3) For my 5 year old son, a 1999 comics digest of Scooby-Doo comics.

4) Eagle-eyed Rich Tommaso ran across this one; Donald Westlake’s posthumous thriller “The Comedy is Finished”, which Hard Case Crime, knowns for their wonderful crime noir paperback line, published as a hardback. It only came out in 2012, so I was surprised to see it without a dust jacket.


Photos from Saturday night’s MenaceCon 2014. This is the second year that Athens and Atlanta folks have gathered about at my house during the weekend of SPX to eat, drink and read old horror comic books. We thumbed through stacks of books that one another brought with them and talked about comics into the wee hours of Sunday morning. Fun was had by all.


underwhelminglovecraft:

This week’s Underwhelming Lovecraft Comic Synopsis is the 1920 “Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family”. 

underwhelminglovecraft:

This week’s Underwhelming Lovecraft Comic Synopsis is the 1920 “Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family”. 


ryallsfiles:

Happy birthday to the incomparable Sergio Aragones!

Sergio’s Groo splash pages were spectacular.


underwhelminglovecraft:

For the first Underwhelming Lovecraft Comic Synopses, let’s start off with “The Statement of Randolph Carter”, first published in the May, 1920 issue of The Vagrant. 

underwhelminglovecraft:

For the first Underwhelming Lovecraft Comic Synopses, let’s start off with “The Statement of Randolph Carter”, first published in the May, 1920 issue of The Vagrant


underwhelminglovecraft:

I swear I haven’t abandoned this page.
Looking through the Lovecraft creatures I’ve drawn, it hit me that there’s a finite amount of monsters to draw. Sure, there’s the enormous Cthulhu Mythos family tree with its dozens of second cousins with names like Xuszplfaz and Zzzflkbrryynx, but I can only draw a cloud of disgruntled tentacles and teeth so many times before it gets old. I meant to draw the monster from Pickman’s Model, but you probably knew how that was going to play out. And while other authors have created monsters based on Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos, why bother branching out into professional fan fiction? If I went down that road, I could be drawing monsters from now until doomsday. Then, as I was reading a paperback collection of 70’s vampire comics, I ran across these short comics that crammed a lot of story into a page or two. “Maybe I could do one page comics of Lovecraft stories! Just to see if I could tell the entire story in maybe eight panels, tops!” I thought to myself. Making a new Tumblr page would be overkill, so I’m going to devout this page to Underwhelming Lovecraft Comic Synopses. Keep an eye out on this page. I should have some up pretty soon. 
Sincerely;
Patrick Dean

underwhelminglovecraft:

I swear I haven’t abandoned this page.

Looking through the Lovecraft creatures I’ve drawn, it hit me that there’s a finite amount of monsters to draw. Sure, there’s the enormous Cthulhu Mythos family tree with its dozens of second cousins with names like Xuszplfaz and Zzzflkbrryynx, but I can only draw a cloud of disgruntled tentacles and teeth so many times before it gets old. I meant to draw the monster from Pickman’s Model, but you probably knew how that was going to play out. And while other authors have created monsters based on Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos, why bother branching out into professional fan fiction? If I went down that road, I could be drawing monsters from now until doomsday. Then, as I was reading a paperback collection of 70’s vampire comics, I ran across these short comics that crammed a lot of story into a page or two. “Maybe I could do one page comics of Lovecraft stories! Just to see if I could tell the entire story in maybe eight panels, tops!” I thought to myself. Making a new Tumblr page would be overkill, so I’m going to devout this page to Underwhelming Lovecraft Comic Synopses. Keep an eye out on this page. I should have some up pretty soon. 

Sincerely;

Patrick Dean